FAQ

General

  • What if I’m driving and have to call 911?

    First, pull over. Take notice of your surroundings and tell the Call Taker as much detail as possible so they can determine your location. It would help to identify any location markers, signs you have seen, the approximate distance you have travelled and where you left and where you are headed. 

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  • Will I ever have to pay to call 911?

    Other than your monthly 75 cent fee, calls to 911 are always free, even from cell phones and pay phones. Even decommissioned cellular phones still have the ability to call 911.

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  • Should I put 911 on speed dial?

    No, having 911 on a speed dial can contribute to accidental calls to 911. Cellular phones with 911 programmed can be accidently pocket-dialed.

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  • If I accidentally call 911 should I hang up?

    No, stay on the phone and let the 911 Call Taker know that it was a mistake. If you do not stay on the line the Call Taker will have to spend time tracing your call and calling you back to ensure that there is not an emergency.

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  • How do I know if I have a real emergency?

    An emergency is when there is a threat to health, safety or property that requires immediate response of emergency personnel. If an emergency situation arises, ask yourself one important question: Is there an immediate need for emergency service personnel to protect or save a life, safety or property? If you think it is, or if you are in doubt, call 911.

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  • Should I dial 911 if I have a non-emergency situation?

    No, do not dial 911 for non-emergency situations. For non-emergency situations find the appropriate local phone number to inquire related. 911 phone lines should be kept free for emergency situations.

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  • What is my 75 cent monthly fee being used for?

    There is a 75 cent monthly fee charged on all phone lines in Newfoundland and Labrador, which is used to fund the 911 service for the province. This fee is specifically used for the administration and operation of the current province-wide 911 service, as well to improve the current 911 system and develop and implement an Enhanced 911 (E911) and eventually a Next Generation 911 (NG911) system.

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  • How do people who are deaf, hard of hearing or have communication disabilities access NL911 services?

    There are two ways that NL911 can assist people who are deaf, hard of hearing or have communication disabilities with getting emergency help:

    1. Each NL911 Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) currently operates a TeleTypewriter (TTY) for people who use TTY. A  TTY is a device that a person can type their messages directly to a 911 Call taker who is operating the TTY.  

    2. If a person who is deaf, hard of hearing or has communication disabilities, and has no access to TTY, they can call 911 for help on a landline telephone or cell phone. When calls are received where there is no voice response or difficulty understanding the caller, the 911 Call Taker will complete a call trace to determine the location of the caller and assist with contacting emergency services for that location. 

    If possible the caller is encouraged to keep repeating the following information:
    • they need help from the police, fire or ambulance, 
    • the phone number they are calling from,
    • the address or location of the emergency.

    It is essential that these callers remain on the line and repeat the vital information (if possible) so that the 911 Call Taker can identify the correct agency to respond for the area and assist with contacting those emergency responders for help.  People who have communication disabilities are encouraged to make any noise to indicate help is needed. For these calls the 911 Call Taker will complete the call trace and assist with contacting emergency help.

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